A Down to Earth Guide to SDLC Project Management


DowntoEarth

While this book is not an architecture book, I’ve always maintained that architects need to be across the entire project delivery life cycle. So I think it’s relevant.

I’ll start with the book’s shortcomings,  but don’t let them put you off, as it does have something to offer. To be frank,  the style is a little rough, perhaps naive would be a better word, but there’s nothing here that a good copy editor couldn’t sort out.  Personally, I’m not a fan of the “Dummies Guide” style of cartoons that the author uses, but they say a picture is worth a thousand words, and that’s perhaps particularly true when the writing’s not that good. Well, that’s enough bagging, and to miss-use another well worn saying, you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. Or good ideas by their presentation.

This book is the very thoughtful work of, a clearly very bright person, who was thrown in the deep end. Placed in that unenviable position rather than just panicking, he embarked on a a crash course education in project management and the result is this book.

It’s clearly  intended for people in similar circumstances and, when you accept that that is the origin of its shortcomings, it works very well. The author trots through the usual stuff, with an often surprising and refreshing combination of naivete and intelligent insight, and that’s what saves the book. It keeps throwing up little variations on the usual.

The author fearlessly tackles the tricky questions. Take for example, a question that stumps many experienced project managers. How do you reconcile the inclination to a waterfall view of the world, that project managers have, with an agile software development methodologies? While the book’ s views are sometimes a little unorthodox, they are typically thought through and well argued.

This is an ideal book for PMs just starting out and as a refresher for experienced PMs and Architects.

The book will undoubtedly, irritate some people, they shouldn’t buy it. But, I have to say that I bought and I think its worth its space on the book shelf. It’s a little, irreverent and a little disruptive, to the usual project management discourse and I like that.

Boyde, Joshua 2013, A Down to Earth Guide to SDLC Project Management

 

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